Deschutes National Forest - Madras, OR
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Deschutes National Forest
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In 1908, the Deschutes National Forest was established from parts of the Blue Mountains, Cascade, and Fremont National Forests. In 1911, parts of the Deschutes National Forest were split off to form the Ochoco and Paulina National Forests and parts of the Cascade and Oregon National Forests were added to the Deschutes. In 1915, the lands of the Paulina National Forest were rejoined to the Deschutes National Forest.
The Deschutes National Forest encompasses more than 1.6 million acres extending 100 miles along the east side of the Cascade Mountains. The forest is a scenic backdrop of volcanic mountains and alpine forests, dense evergreen forests, mountain lakes, caves, desert areas, and alpine meadows. Elevations range from 1,950 feet to 10,358 feet.
Nestled along the Cascade Mountains, the Deschutes National Forest is one of the most popular recreation forests in the Pacific Northwest. The Forest attracts more than 8 million people every year who come to camp, fish, hike, hunt, ski, and enjoy a multitude of outdoor activities. The forest contains five wilderness areas, six national wild and scenic rivers, the Oregon Cascade Recreation Area, the Metolius Conservation Area, and the Newberry National Volcanic Monument. The Deschutes National Forest also include three of Oregon's highest peaks to challenge mountain climbers.
With over 100 campgrounds, Deschutes National Forest is a campers dream. The campgrounds range from primitive to fully developed. Many of the campgrounds within the forest are handicap accessible.
With over 150 lakes and 500 miles of streams, the Deschutes National Forest offers great fishing and boating opportunities. Common fish species include bull trout, chinook salmon, mountain whitefish, rainbow trout, redband trout, sockeye/kokanee atlantic salmon, brook trout, brown trout, cutthroat trout, lake trout black crappie, brown bullhead catfish, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass.
Each year, thousands of rockhounds, pebble puppies and people interested in looking for rocks visit the Deschutes National Forest. When the Earth formed, the geology of the central Oregon area resulted in a wide variety of rock types in a relatively small area. Crook County is rightfully known as the rockhound capital of the world. There are areas that are free for the public to access in search of agate, jasper, limbcast, petrified wood, moss, dendrite and angel wing.
The Deschutes National Forest is a great place for bird watching. There are many species of falcons, hawks, eagles, owls, vultures, geese, swans, grebes, loons, ducks, fowls, hummingbirds, swifts, woodpeckers, doves, pigeons, crows, sparrows, swallows, wrens, gulls, cranes, and much more.
Mammals that can be seen in the Deschutes National Forest include over ten species of bats, black bear, bobcats, lynx, mountain lions, coyote, gray fox, red fox, bighorn sheep, black tailed deer, elk, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope. There are also several species of rabbits, raccoons, rodents, moles, and weasels present. There are over 30 species of frogs, toads, salamanders, snakes, turtles, and lizards in the Deschutes National Forest.
There are hundreds of miles of trails open to multiple recreational activity. There are about a dozen trails and play areas designated to off highway vehicle use.
There are many mountain biking trails in the forest. There are some designated biking routes that combine trails and roads to create loop trip opportunities. Nearly all of the trails throughout the forest are open to hikers. They range from easy to difficult with lengths anywhere from 0.3 miles to 43 miles.
There are eleven designated trails throughout the Deschutes National Forest that are handicap accessible. They range from easy to difficult. Many of the trails are paved for easy wheelchair access.
From the Cascade Mountains on its western border to the high desert country east of Bend, from the old growth ponderosa pine forests along the Metolius River to Crescent and Odell Lakes in the south, the Deschutes National Forest is a true four season vacationland.


Facilities: Deschutes National Forest provides picnic areas and over 100 campgrounds ranging from primitive to fully developed. Many of the campground provide restrooms.

Best Time To Visit: Deschutes National Forest is open year round to a variety of recreational opportunities. From the Cascade Mountains on its western border to the high desert country east of Bend, from the old growth ponderosa pine forests along the Metolius River to Crescent and Odell Lakes in the south, the Deschutes National Forest is a true four season vacationland.

Fees: Parking, camping, and/or entrance fees may be charged at some of the recreation sites within Deschutes National Forest.

Accessibility: Many of the campgrounds within the forest are handicap accessible. There are eleven designated trails throughout the Deschutes National Forest that are handicap accessible.

Rules: Rockhound collections sites within the forest are for personal use only, not for commercial resale. Obey road restrictions. Check local fire and fishing regulations. Pets are required to be on a leash at all times. No motorized vehicles are allowed within the designated wilderness areas. Campgrounds may have maximum length of stay restrictions.

Directions: The Deschutes National Forest encompasses more than 1.6 million acres extending 100 miles along the east side of the Cascade Mountains in central Oregon.

Map: Click here for a map to Deschutes National Forest

Reservations: Reservations are not needed or accepted to visit Deschutes National Forest. Reservations may be accepted or required for campgrounds and other recreation sites within the forest. Deschutes National Forest

 
Address
Deschutes National Forest
1001 SW Emkay Drive
Bend, Oregon 97702
Phone
General: (541) 383-5300
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